The Charming Streets of Kinsale

Nestled on the edge of the south coast of Ireland and surrounded by the natural beauty of the glorious Irish countryside, the picturesque town of Kinsale offers a warm welcome to travellers from all over the globe.

At first glance, one may wonder why this small town attracts so many visitors, but after being lucky enough to spend a few days exploring on my recent trip to Ireland, it was quickly clear to me just what was so appealing about it.

Kinsale is full of colour and characterand every time you turn a corner on the countless skinny, winding roads, you are met with brightly painted houses, charming shops and cafes and, of course, an abundance of traditional pubs. Each locale is packed full of character and provides visitors with the chance to mingle with the friendly locals in front of a roaring fire. From my own experience, this was the perfect way to warm up on a damp windy night – Kinsale is perched on the edge of the Atlantic Ocean, after all!

When in Ireland…it would be rude not to!

The seaside location means there are countless restaurants offering freshly caught seafood, but I found I was also spoiled for choice with other local goodies such as cheese and whisky – there is definitely a reason why Kinsale has the most restaurants per head in Ireland . There is even a Willy Wonka-esque chocolate shop where all sorts of wacky creations are created on site! I was also able to sample culinary delights in the food markets set up along cobbled streets that are not much wider than a car.

My time in Kinsale was brief, but I am already planning a return visit on my next trip to Ireland. As it lies on the famous Wild Atlantic Way driving route, it is an excellent base where drivers can explore the surrounding area of County Cork and follow the twisting winding roads that scale the coastline of this breath-taking part of the country. I can only imagine the other quaint villages and beautiful beaches in this area, and I am itching to discover them.

The delicious food, postcard-perfect buildings, and shops full of quirky trinkets – many of which I happily lost an afternoon browsing through – meant Kinsale ticked all of the boxes on my holiday wish list!

McKinlay Kidd offer a number of holidays along the illustrious Wild Atlantic Way, many of which include a trip to Kinsale. Browse our Ireland holidays on our website, or alternatively give us a call on 0141 260 9260 to arrange a tailor-made Ireland holiday that suits your exact requirements.

South by Southwest: Hamish’s home from home

Given that I was brought up in the South West of Scotland, it seemed apt that my first visit to Ireland with McKinlay Kidd was to the South West of the Island to discover the Wild Atlantic WayCork and Kerry. The similarities were uncanny; rolling hills, lush green forests, rugged coastlines and long sandy beaches. Not forgetting of course, the warm and friendly locals.

Flying from Glasgow to Cork, a journey of around an hour and fifteen minutes, you get a wonderful view of the whole of Ireland. My approach was augmented by some wonderful autumnal sunshine which bounced off the Celtic Sea.

The Dingle Peninsula, one of the Gaeltacht areas of Ireland (where Irish is widely spoken), was my first stop. What struck me instantly was the slowing in the pace of life, everyone from locals to the tourists seemed to be going about their business in an unhurried fashion. A must see stop is the Inch Strand, a long sand spit backed by a dune system reaching into Dingle Bay. Popular with surfers as illustrated on my visit, I was rather wishing that I had brought my own wetsuit to go for a swim!

Next was the famous Ring of Kerry. I drove round the entirety of the 120 mile circular route which is one of the country’s most popular tourist trails.  As a Star Wars fan, I was hoping to have had the opportunity to take one of the boat trips from Portmagee to view the dramatic island monastery at Skellig Michael, but alas the weather thought otherwise. However, there are plenty of other options to enjoy the open views of the mountains, coast and islands of the area.

West Cork was my last destination, with the fishing village of Baltimore first on the list of places to see. En route to Baltimore, the section from Kenmare in Kerry to Glengarriff in Cork was one of the most spectacular I’ve ever had the pleasure of driving. Jaw dropping scenery is around every corner and the road scythes through the mountains via tunnels carved into the rock in the mid-nineteenth century during famine times.

Rock Tunnel Drive, Old Kenmare Road
Rock Tunnel Drive, Old Kenmare Road

Baltimore is the place to be if you want to see Wildlife in West Cork. Marine life is bountiful, with whales topping the bill, as well as seabirds which frequent the cliffs of Cape Clear Island, just a short boat journey from Baltimore.

Kinsale was my last stop in West Cork and Ireland. What a place to finish, despite my visit coinciding with the winding down of the tourist season, the town was buzzing. Unfortunately, I was a week late for the famous Kinsale Gourmet Festival, which celebrated its 40th anniversary in 2016. However, Kinsale is known as the “Gourmet Capital of Ireland”, meaning there is good food to be had all year round! My trip came to a wonderful end in a cosy bar, full of locals and visitors alike enjoying a pint of Guinness whilst listening to a local band playing traditional Irish Music.

The recurring theme of my visit to Ireland was the friendliness and generosity of the people I met. No matter where I went, I was greeted with a smile and an enquiry as to how I was enjoying my time in Ireland, with recommendations of what to do or see next. The genuine interest all my hosts had in my trip and their eagerness to show off their homeland was incredibly endearing. I can’t wait for my next visit!