Wild Encounters in the Cairngorms National Park

Being brought up in a small village in the heart of the Northern Irish countryside means I have many fond memories from my childhood that feature local wildlife. Walks at dusk along the country lanes to spot bats with my dad were common, while foxes and grey squirrels were frequent visitors to my grandparents’ garden.

For these reasons and more, I was delighted recently to have the chance to spend a weekend getting up close to the wildlife of the Cairngorms National Park – the largest national park in the UK. Spanning over 4500km, there are enough activities to last a lifetime – unfortunately, we had just one weekend to do as much as possible! I felt a sense of excitement building as I found myself surrounded by towering peaks and emerald forestry on our drive into the Highlands. Although I love living in a vibrant city like Glasgow, it is true what they say – you can take the girl out of the countryside, but you can’t take the countryside out of the girl!

Our wildlife sightings began early into the trip, as we scaled the mighty Cairn Gorm Mountain on the railway funicular. As I was gazing out of the window with the landscape opening up around me, I noticed a flash of movement from the corner of my eye. A young deer was scampering down the slope! I always find it so thrilling to see deer in the wild – little did I know that this was just the beginning of my day’s sightings.

After a quick bite to eat and a wander around the village of Carrbridge, we were ready to explore a small section of the national park on foot. Our choice for the day was Loch an Eilein. One of the quieter lochs in the Cairngorms, Loch an Eilein is unique due to the small island sitting off the shore, featuring the ruins of a crumbling castle. Before our walk even began, I was greeted with an unforgettable sight– a trio of red squirrels in their natural habitat. Each was happily munching on some nuts and completely unbothered by our presence as we furiously snapped some photos – unsurprising really as this encounter took place in the car park! This was the first time I had ever seen a red squirrel, aside from a fleeting glimpse while driving on the Isle of Arran. We didn’t see any more during our walk, but as we strolled through dense forestry on the loch-side in bright sunshine, I was sure they were around somewhere.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

That evening was undoubtedly the highlight of our trip; we had booked in to spend a few hours in a purpose-built wildlife hide, nestled deep in the Speyside area. Once greeted by our informative and friendly guide, we got comfortable in the cosy room but remained alert, keeping a keen eye out for any signs of life. Luckily, we didn’t need to wait long. A tiny field mouse scrambled up the rocks, nibbling on the various treats that were left out by our guide.

But this was only the beginning. Around twenty minutes into the experience, a young badger cub sniffed his way into the clearing, and began feasting on the seeds directly in front of the windows. Slowly, he was followed by not one, but three other young cubs from the same sett! We sat in silence, watching in awe as they interacted and came into what seemed to be touching distance.

The star of the night however, had not yet emerged. We were told in advance that the pine marten had not been spotted in around a week, so we would be lucky if we caught a glimpse of one that night. Fortunately, the odds were in our favour and a young male appeared while the four badgers were still sniffing around! We were spellbound as we watched him climb and jump around a tree, in particular enjoying the peanut butter. At one point there was a strong wind which scattered all of the animals, which we thought had ended our encounter, but we were still delighted with what we had seen.

Pine Marten

But luck was to strike once more – not only did each badger cub come back, but so did the young pine marten. The wildlife hide seared itself on my memory as an evening I would never forget. One of the only creatures I didn’t spot in the Cairngorms is the incredibly rare wildcat – perhaps next time!

The Cairngorms National Park is undoubtedly a haven for those who love nature and wildlife. Fortunately, McKinlay Kidd offer a specific wildlife holiday to allow you to have these experiences for yourself – or you can tailor-make any of our other holidays to include some wildlife watching activities.

The Cotswolds – Quintessentially English

Although I was born and raised in Northern Scotland, my mum is from the south of England and this has always been a very important part of my family heritage. When I think of England, it is the small towns and villages of the south that are immediately conjured up in my imagination– an idyllic scene of sitting outside a 15th century pub on a long summer evening, enjoying a jug of fruity Pimms as a cricket match plays out in the background on a village green.

Earlier this year I was lucky enough to revisit the Cotswolds, well known worldwide for its rolling countryside and pretty chocolate-box villages. The Cotswolds Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty covers almost 800 square miles across five English counties and stretches between the historic cities of Oxford, Cheltenham and Bath – all of which are certainly worth a visit in their own right. I was based in beautiful Bath staying in a newly renovated Georgian guest house in the centre of town and spent my first day exploring the city with extreme fascination, taking in the Roman Baths, the Abbey and a walking tour that focused on one of my favourite English authors -Jane Austen – and her connections to the city. Following a delicious dinner in a fantastic bistro on the historic Pulteney Bridge, I returned to my guest house with a smile and sank into the comfortable bed waiting in my room.

The following morning, I was collected by a private driver guide and within minutes I was out of the city and heading deep into the tranquil Cotswolds. Of course, as one of England’s best-known regions, there is no doubt that some areas of the Cotswolds are very busy with tourists. Plus, proximity to London does mean it attracts numerous coach tourists and day-trippers.

For this reason, I would always recommend going out for the day with a local guide as I did, to help you really get under the skin of the destination and provide local knowledge and tips you could never discover alone. My guide Jules explained the patchwork history of the Cotswolds – how the region was key to the foundation of England itself, the story of the development of its distinct culture and even the rise of the wool industry, which was so important for the people of the area. Combined with the backdrop of a beautiful drive through the countryside, this really was a day to remember. We passed villages constructed from that traditional honey-coloured Cotswold stone and enjoyed a visit to an ancient abbey, tea at the oldest hotel in England and a traditional ploughmans lunch in an atmospheric pub. The English pub, especially in rural areas, is so much more than just a place to eat and drink. It also acts as a social hub and focal point for the community. So if you would like to meet the locals and really get a good understanding of the destination, just head to the local hostelry! I have to say that after this trip, I think the English ‘do’ pubs better than anyone else in the world (sorry, Ireland!).

As we drove back to Bath, I reflected on my fascinating and enjoyable day learning more about where my family came from. I decided I would return as often as possible to keep exploring this most beautiful and interesting of regions, so fundamentally English in its character, culture and charm.

If you would like to experience the charms of the Cotswolds for yourself, our team would be delighted to tailor-make your perfect holiday. 

Falling in Love with the Isle of Skye

Somewhere along the Scottish coast

An emerald island lies

So I will steer my sailing boat

Unto the Isle of Skye”

[Andrew Peterson]

I take a glance in the rear view mirror, and can see Glasgow slowly disappearing as we drive north. The weather may have been dreich (dreary) when we left the city, but I can already see the clouds lifting as we inch closer to our destination. I turn the music up, and smile – I am on my way to the Isle of Skye for the very first time.

The road bends along the shore of the magnificent Loch Lomond and through the spectacular valley of Glencoe. I like this drive – it feels like the narrower the road gets, the more spectacular the views become; I feel rewarded for driving there. What I don’t know yet is that this feeling of wonder won’t leave me for the next three days.

One of our first destinations is the Old Man of Storr. I had seen pictures of this iconic location in guide books and all over the Internet for years. I was worried of being disappointed with the reality of the landscape, but I couldn’t have been more wrong. The beauty and unique atmosphere of the place make it a must-see attraction and gives you infinite photo opportunities.

Old Man of Storr, Isle of Skye
My view of the Old Man of Storr

Back on the road again, I cannot remember the last time I was so astounded by a drive. The scenery surprises me at every corner, ever-changing from flat and grassy land to rocky jagged mountains, secluded inlets to expansive sea views, bustling towns to tranquil glens. On each narrow winding road, we are constantly on the lookout for parking places to stop and take pictures. I soon discover that photos can’t quite do the beauty justice, so, I decide to stop looking through the lens of my camera and focus on the moment – once again, I cannot stop smiling. A few more “wows” and we hop back into the car – until we next cannot resist stopping again, of course.

In the evening on our way back from the famous Fairy Pools, the midges have come out but the sky is still too bright to call it a day, so we walk to a local pub. When we open the door, we are welcomed by delightful live music – a local Cèilidh band is playing! The crowd is so energetic that we can barely see the musicians- tables have been pushed to the side and everyone is dancing.

The sun rises so early in this season that the sky is already bright as we wake up the next day. Today, we decide to hike up Blà Bheinn, one of Skye’s twelve Munros. Here again, the landscape constantly changes as we hike up. Slowly but surely, the dense vegetation gives way to a rockier scramble, and the view reveals itself as we reach higher ground.

It is nearly lunch time when we reach the summit. Our legs feel heavy after the strenuous ascent, but somehow we cannot stop walking – the view in every direction is spectacular. We want to see as much as we can, so we continue walking along a narrow ridge to reach a second summit.  Eventually we decide to drop our bags, choosing some rocks to be our lofty thrones, victorious after a fierce hike. We sit in silence, contemplating the horizon. The Cuillin Mountains are visible below the clouds and in one direction we can see the Isle of Rum. This is a hike that I will not forget in a hurry.

Bla Bheinn, Isle of Skye
The panorama from the the ascent of Bla Bheinn

Sadly, the time eventually comes for us to say goodbye to this remarkable island. As we drive away, I look in the rear view mirror one more time. However, I know that I am not really leaving the Isle of Skye today, because every day at McKinlay Kidd we travel back there – virtually – as our customers travel to ensure that your experience on this island is incredible, and that like me, a smile does not leave your face for the duration of your stay.

If you would like to experience the spectacular Isle of Skye – perhaps with a little less walking! – then our West Highland Line to Skye, West Coast Whisky Islands or Skye & Hebrides Fly-Drive holidays may fit the bill. Alternatively, we would be delighted to tailor-make your unforgettable trip.

Words and images from Helene at McKinlay Kidd.

Discovering Mackintosh: An Exploration of Glasgow

As someone who has lived in Glasgow for less than a year, there are so many activities and places that I am still exploring every day. If there is one thing I have noticed time and time again, it is the influence of Charles Rennie Mackintosh, one of Glasgow’s – and indeed Scotland’s – most daring, innovative and influential creative figures.

Recently there has been another tragic fire in Mackintosh’s School of Art, meaning this particular site will not be accessible for some time. However, as 2018 marks the 150th anniversary of his birth, there are spaces all over Glasgow dedicated to Mackintosh and his life’s work. I decided that this – combined with an opportune visit from my art-loving parents – created the perfect occasion to begin my journey discovering the legacy of this fascinating man.

 

Charles Rennie Mackintosh: Making the Glasgow Style (29th March – 14th August 2018)

One of the many exhibits in Kelvingrove Museum

This temporary exhibition offered the perfect first step in my Mackintosh education. I found myself in the spectacular surroundings of Kelvingrove Museum, marvelling at over 250 items – some never before seen in public–from both Mackintosh and other influential designers of the time.

The exhibition is surprisingly interactive – one of my personal highlights is the 7-minute video that explores Glasgow with cameras and drones, covering both the exterior and interior design of many of Mackintosh’s most famous works and those he inspired. Included in this footage was – to my delight – the famous Hatrack building – also known as McKinlay Kidd’s new office!

 

Mackintosh at the Willow

Mackintosh at the Willow
The interior of Mackintosh at the Willow

A long beloved Glasgow institution, 217 Sauchiehall Street is the site of Mackintosh’s original tearooms, unique in the fact that Mackintosh not only designed the interior, but the exterior of the building.

Willow china
The pretty blue china is perfectly placed on each table

The refurbished tearooms have only been open for a few weeks and are not entirely complete, but the experience of dining there is already superb. I took my parents for a mid-afternoon snack and we were impressed with the attention to detail. The devotion to Mackintosh’s original work is clear, from the style of the chairs to the light fixtures, the stained glass balcony to the blue Willow china. There is also a fabulous gift shop that enables you to bring some of the tearoom’s design into your own home. Not to mention the delicious scones – an absolute must after a long day shopping or sightseeing in Glasgow city centre!

 

House for an Art Lover

The Dining Room at House for an Art Lover
The Dining Room at House for an Art Lover

It is actually due to McKinlay Kidd that I was fortunate enough to attend House for An Art Lover after hours, as we recently celebrated our 15th birthday as a company in the lavish dining and music rooms.

Although not constructed until 1989, the plans for House for An Art Lover were created by Mackintosh in 1901 and the building really is a testament to his enigmatic artistic vision.  The décor and the surroundings of Bellahouston Park foster a special ambiance.

 

Mackintosh House

The Exterior of Mackintosh House

One of the most unique art installations in the city, Mackintosh House is a full-scale replica of the house where Charles and his wife Margaret lived, adjacent to the Hunterian Museum in Glasgow’s West End.

By the time I visited the house, I was aware of the signs of a tell-tale Mackintosh masterpiece, meaning I could appreciate the intricate detail of each room. His use of light, for example– his designs always managed to make a room as bright and light as possible. From the coat rack to the fireplaces and writing bureaus, the Mackintosh belief that every element of the interior had to work in perfect harmony is clear.

 

No matter where I went, one fundamental fact remained – the sheer detail involved in Mackintosh’s work is extraordinary. Down to even the letterheads for the Glasgow School of Art, Mackintosh would clearly eat, sleep and breathe his work, unable to rest as he was designing another masterpiece.

Interestingly, something that really spoke to me as I explored the city was the profound impact that Mackintosh’s wife, Margaret, had not only on the Glasgow style, but on the design so synonymous with the Mackintosh name. She designed the menus for Miss Cranston’s tearooms, the decorative panels for the music room in House for An Art Lover and indeed was responsible for much of the interior of Mackintosh House. While the focus this year is on her husband, it is clear that Margaret is worthy of equal accolade.

One thing is certain; I am now walking the streets of Glasgow with a greater appreciation for the man who left an indelible mark on the city with his creative vision.

15 Years of McKinlay Kidd: Anniversary Interview

Recently McKinlay Kidd celebrated a very significant milestone – our 15th anniversary of seeking out locations, activities and accommodation that allow our customers to see Britain and Ireland differently. Our founders, Robert Kidd and Heather McKinlay, sat down to reflect on the journey so far.

Why did you decide to start McKinlay Kidd?

Robert – I’ve been asked this question a lot, and I give a different answer every time! It all traces back to when Heather and I first met, working for a large tour operator. By that point we had both been bitten by the travel bug – it really is the most exciting industry to be part of because you are selling unforgettable experiences to people. We always knew we wanted to run our own hospitality business and we had a really in-depth understanding of good tour operating practise. A redundancy package in 2003 gave us the opportunity to really go for it.

Heather – We always loved travelling and suggesting hidden gems and quirky places to go to our friends. The original idea was to help people experience Scotland differently, the way we have always loved to ourselves.

 

What have been your personal highlights of the last 15 years?

Heather – (Laughs) There have been far too many to mention! For me, the feeling when you discover somewhere great to stay is special. I’ll always remember a trip one February. First, we went to an incredibly remote part of Scotland called the Knoydart Peninsula, cut off from the main UK road network. We took a boat over with a walking guide and ended up scrambling 500m up in snow and ice before heading back to our cottage for the evening – only to find that it was freezing inside as well as outside! We ended up having a fantastic night around the fire and impromptu ceilidh with some other visitors but later I could hardly sleep at all as it was so bitter cold. Then – as a total contrast – we spent the next night at the luxurious Isle of Eriska, a five star hotel on a private island.  I’ll never forget unwinding – and thawing out – in a hot tub under the stars.

Robert – I love sending people to places we feel passionately about, empty beaches and little corners you’ve never heard of. We’ve also met some wonderful people over the years, both customers and business partners, who we now count as friends. But I suppose my personal highlight is the fact I am sending so many customers on holiday to Northern Ireland. As a child of the Troubles, having the opportunity to send people to my favourite parts of my beautiful home country is an amazing feeling – I still get a thrill every time we get a Northern Ireland booking.

 

How do you choose where to offer to customers?

Heather – We want people to get to places they may never have thought of before. When Robert suggested creating holidays to Shetland, I wasn’t at all convinced. Thank goodness he changed my mind – it has become one of our most beloved and popular destinations! So we always try to look at things a little differently.

Robert – When we first sent people to the Isle of Skye without cars, I was told we were crazy. But the reality was that people wanted to go! A huge part of choosing our destinations relies on finding people in the area who share our outlook and vision – a taxi driver who can become a private tour guide, for example. As a result, we have built very strong relationships with local business partners over the years.

 

What is your favourite destination that McKinlay Kidd offer?

Heather – It changes all the time!

Robert – Aside from my home country, I really love the West of Ireland. In general through, stick me on an island or an empty beach and I’ll be happy. Shetland is a personal favourite, the Scottish borders are also beautiful, Wales has a lot to offer…

Heather – You’ve just said everywhere is your favourite!

Robert –The list never ends! I suppose the best way to show our favourite destinations is actually through our new 15th anniversary holiday. Heather and I sat down with our Product Manager Chris for a few hours one day and brainstormed all of our favourite destinations and activities. We then drew these highlights together in a way that would make the trip the most enjoyable for our customers, and I have to say that I think we have succeeded.

Heather – I love places that are a bit out of the way. The Isle of Gigha in particular – my Dad is from that area and I remember writing a school project years ago about a trip to the island after a family holiday in Kintyre. Now we make a point of trying to go there once a year to sample their delicious seafood – Chris (one of McKinlay Kidd’s sales advisors) went recently and it has made us long to re-visit soon! Equally, though, I love going back to London. I grew up on the outskirts so I always get a thrill walking those familiar streets, no matter how busy.

 

What is the most important lesson you have learned in these 15 years of McKinlay Kidd?

Robert – The most important thing to us will always be our relationship with our customers. People on holiday want to have a great time, so we make sure we are with them every step of the way to offer help if it is needed. There will always be challenges – particularly from the weather in this part of the world – but we can always learn from the experience and change things for the future.

Heather – For me it is definitely to never stop trying new things. This is the foundation of the company – we weren’t following anyone else’s model when we started the business. The first time we really had to adapt was a few years in, when the economy was in a downturn. We made the decision to purchase a Jaguar E-Type to help promote our classic car trips – we had been renting until that point – and this was really successful for us the following year. We only kept the car for a couple of years, but it opened up possibilities for us. Now we offer holidays touring in a Tesla, for example.

Robert – We were the first company to do a lot of things; to offer classic car touring packages, whale-watching holidays to the Isle of Mull, to send people to three different islands on one holiday, to offer independent train touring in Scotland…the list goes on.

 

Finally, what are your plans for the next 15 years of McKinlay Kidd?

Heather – (Laughs) That’s a difficult question! The world is constantly changing – smartphones didn’t exist 15 years ago for example. I want to make sure we stay true to our values. We want to grow, but we never want to lose sight of our vision as a small company that offers real personalised service to every single customer. The more technology evolves, the more personal contact will leave other businesses – so this is more important to us than ever, as it sets us apart from the crowd.

Robert – I would say that I hope we aren’t that different in 15 years. We will offer different products, experiences and potentially some destinations outside the UK & Ireland, I don’t know. But like Heather, I want our values to remain the same, in terms of team dynamic and the services we offer. McKinlay Kidd is built on personal contact with our staff, so while technology will be helpful, people to people interaction will still be our main focus. I’m very happy with how things are, so in a way I don’t want things to change too much…though, of course, they probably will.

A Wild Day in the West of Scotland

Otters are supposedly secretive creatures but not this one! Last weekend we were sitting on our rug on the rocks enjoying peace and quiet and warm sunshine on a deserted Kintyre beach. Out of the corner of my eye, I saw movement, a glimpse of brown. Ah, that would be a dog, no doubt closely followed by its two-legged owner. Wrong, I realised, that’s actually a rather large dog otter padding its way across the sand! I resisted the temptation to let out a squeal from my wide-open mouth. Instead I turned to Robert beside me, nudging him and gesturing to draw his attention.

We both watched in awe as the rather ungainly creature wobbled his way to the water’s edge, then slipped sveltely into the brine, transformed into a darting swimmer. Arching his back, he dipped under, his long tail flicking behind. We rummaged for the i-phone and binoculars as silently as we could. He emerged amid the lapping seaweed, hungrily devouring a small, silver fish. Then he dipped back under, reappearing with a large crab. He was close enough for us to observe with naked eyes, hearing the crunch-crunch as his sharp teeth cracked their way into the shell. The scene repeated itself for several more minutes as we did our best to take a few snaps and short videos on the phone, albeit needing to zoom.

While our new furry friend was swimming around, we stealthily moved a little nearer. At this point we saw criss-crossing footprints all over the wet sand behind us – the creature had clearly been wandering around unbeknown to us for quite some time earlier. As good fortune would have it, the otter next popped up further to our left and hauled itself out into a barnacled rock, its shiny brown coat perfectly contrasting with the grey-white stone. Robert started filming.

Earlier the same day I had been strolling on a neighbouring beach as a pod of a dozen or so dolphins splashed their way past – just the third time in fifteen years I’d watched such a sight from these strands.

And our wildlife adventure had yet another twist to come. After the excitement of our close encounter with the otter, we settled down to enjoy the more regular birdlife: diving gannets, screeching oystercatchers, swooping gulls, darting sand martins, elegant terns and the occasional pair of adult ducks followed by a stream of cute ducklings. A grebe, with its distinctive head-dress, swam quietly past.

The tide had recently but imperceptibly turned, the sea still flat calm, a shimmering steel-blue colour. We spotted a black shape purposefully heading out to sea towards the Isle of Sanda. Our first instinct was to think it was the otter, but the swimming style was all wrong. The binoculars revealed a clear triangular fin scything through the water. Cue Jaws theme music.

However, in the West of Scotland, the only sharks are of the more benign basking kind. They prey on plankton, hoovering it up through a gaping jaw. We’ve seen them before off the Isle of Mull on one of McKinlay Kidd’s wildlife trips, but this was a first (and shortly after, a second) for us in Kintyre. Local knowledge suggests these huge mammals used to be much more numerous but have been very scarce in recent years. The sea conditions aided our chances of spotting them and perhaps the recent lengthy spell of warm and settled weather had led to an abundance of food, attracting them back to the area.

In any case, it was the perfect end to a very wild day!

Words by Heather@McKinlayKidd. Video by Robert@McKinlayKidd

London: The City of Dreams

The writer Dr Samuel Johnson once said ‘when a man is tired of London, he is tired of life’, and I certainly have some sympathy with his argument. Like many young Scots and others from around the globe, I found my way to this innovative city straight after finishing my university studies and ended up spending most of my 20s there.

The term ‘global city’ is banded about quite a bit these days but London really does live up to this title.  Within the city 300 languages are spoken on a daily basis, and almost 40% of the population were born outside the UK. You have the opportunity to dine in restaurants offering every conceivable global cuisine, shop at markets with goods from all over the world and mingle with people from every country you could think of. However, although a cultural melting pot, you are also never far away from the quintessential ‘British’ experience in London, be it the changing of the guard at Buckingham Palace, glimpsing of a red telephone box at the end of a handsome Victorian terrace, or passing police officers in their traditional custodian helmets.

Last weekend I made one of my frequent visits back to the metropolis to see friends and catch up with the dizzying pace of change in this global city. Since departing back in 2014, I have seen many changes and one of my great joys comes from re-visiting familiar haunts to see how they have developed since I moved on. As such a large city London can seem intimidating, especially for a first-time visitor. Some advice I was once given is to think of it not as one large city,  but rather a collection of villages, each with its own main street, station, community and distinct character, and I find this very useful. The only way to see London is by exploring each of the individual neighbourhoods so you can really get under the skin of the city and see what makes it tick. For this reason I would recommend that rather than take the famous London Underground to get from A to B, you should walk where possible or alternatively sit on the top level of one of the city’s iconic red double-decker buses to get a bird’s eye view of the skyline.

Here at McKinlay Kidd, we know London intimately and our speciality is advising you on how to discover the city beyond the tourist clichés. We always include the more quirky and lesser known attractions and a specially curated art trail for all of our clients who will be visiting London as well as our own personal recommendations and favourite restaurants. We work with a small collection of family-run, original hotels in some fantastic central locations and can also set you up with one of our local guides for the day. London is at the centre of the UK and Ireland’s transport network so lends itself perfectly for a stopover at the beginning or end of a McKinlay Kidd holiday in Scotland, Ireland or elsewhere in England.

So the question is this; if I love it so much, why did I leave? Like all truly global cities, London does face challenges, notably the high cost of living and exorbitant housing prices. I made the decision to return north of the border to buy my own property and be closer to family, and I don’t regret it at all. At times like last Saturday though, as I sat sipping a gin and tonic with dear friends overlooking the Thames, I do feel incredibly lucky that I got to spend some of the best years of my life in this amazing city.

Words by Tom Hamilton @ McKinlay Kidd, with images from Chris @ McKinlay Kidd

 

The Isle of Gigha: Perfect Antidote to City Life

I recently set off from the bustling city centre of Glasgow on a gloriously sunny Saturday afternoon to enjoy a relaxing bank holiday weekend and experience island life on the Isle of Gigha.

Even the drive to the ferry port was spectacular. By the time I hit Loch Lomond, the weather had turned in true Scottish fashion. The majestic scenery was blanketed in a layer of stunning low cloud, turning the journey into a beautiful and dramatic drive! I travelled on through picturesque towns, such as Tarbet and Arrochar, before reaching my personal favourite, Inverary.  With a ferry to catch I tore myself away from the stunning spot, making plans to visit properly on the return trip.

As I made my way towards Tayinloan ferry port the sun broke back through the clouds. I pulled in with enough time to enjoy a quick bite to eat and a refreshing beverage from the family-run cafe close to the dock. I wandered down the pier and was greeted by a white sandy beach with crystal clear water. The view had me almost believing that I was on an exotic island in the Caribbean!

The ferry journey takes around 20 minutes and once disembarking, my hotel for the next two nights was a short two-minute drive from the port.  After a simple check in, I went upstairs to my large double room to the front of the hotel, which had breath-taking views over the Sound of Gigha. That evening I enjoyed a delicious dinner including some locally caught seafood, and made my way to the bar for a night cap and to get to know some of the Gigha locals. However, tonight called for an early night as I prepared to explore the next day.

 

I awoke to another glorious day and tucked into a hearty full Scottish breakfast. I then drove to the South Pier at the southernmost point of the island, where there are some beautiful secluded beaches and more stunning views of mainland Scotland across the water.

Along the way I stopped off at the spectacular Achamore Gardens. These 54-acre gardens host many notable and unusual plants and trees from around the world. Then I continued to the north of the island, and the small bay with its twin apple-core beaches and views out west to the isles of Jura and Islay.

By the late afternoon I had worked up an appetite so made my way to my lunch reservation at the island’s local eatery, located near the ferry port. All I can say is this was a taste sensation and I had some of the best seafood I have ever eaten anywhere; not to mention the views from the table!  The staff were also outstanding, all locals who were never too busy to discuss the island and its rich history.

After my lunch I dropped the car off and went exploring on foot, discovering the local church and golf course. Gigha is a quaint island – the locals are very welcoming and I am very much looking forward to returning.

The next day I was up early to set sail for the Kintyre penninsulaon the first ferry of the day, and quickly found myself heading back north towards Inverary. Here I stopped for a coffee and fresh croissant in one of the many cafes. The town even in the early hours is alive and bustling with visitors! I found myself at the castle and spent some time there taking in the scenery.  My next stop was Loch Fyne where I treated myself to some oysters and chowder at the loch front. I even had time to drop into the local Loch Fyne brewery to buy some craft beer samples to enjoy that evening after getting home.

The weather stayed perfect the whole way back to Glasgow as I ended my trip. The island was beautiful, peaceful and the ideal getaway from the city living. Gigha is definitely a perfect place to relax and unwind!

Words & Images by Chris Stewart @ McKinlay Kidd

 

Bath’s Brilliant Buns

Hidden down one of Bath’s quaint cobbled lanes is the oldest dwelling in the city, established in c.1482. This historical site has been the home to the original “Bath bun” since 1680, when Sally Lunn – the inventor of this regional speciality – was employed in a bakery on the premises.

VB-Sally Lunn's plaque
Commemorative plaque

Story has it that a young Huguenot refugee, Solange Luyon, came to Bath from France in 1680 to escape persecution. She found work in the bakery on what was known at the time as Lilliput Alley. In addition to selling the baker’s wares from a basket, Sally Lunn – as she came to be known, an anglicised version of her name – had a special talent for making a unique brioche bun in the French tradition, resembling French festival breads.

The bun quickly became popular in Georgian England, with customers soon coming to the bakery just to request the unusual delicacy that could be served with either sweet or savoury accompaniments. The bun became known as the “Sally Lunn bun” or “Bath bun” and today is legendary the world over.

A visit to the Sally Lunn tea house and eatery is essential to any visit to the historical city of Bath.

McKinlay Kidd now offers two new itineraries to Bath in 2018. Take a look at Explore Britain by Train and Classic England by Train.

Road tripping on the west coast of Scotland

Recently my colleague, Caoimhe, and I enjoyed a picturesque and slightly Harry Potter-themed adventure to the west coast of Scotland.

Setting off on a lovely Thursday morning we drove up north from Glasgow and past the breath-taking views of Loch Lomond. The burnt orange coloured leaves falling from the trees made our journey all the more beautiful. Every now and then the sun would pop out of the clouds leaving a beautiful rainbow over the glistening water.

Viaduct rainbow - Daniela
Rainbow over the Glenfinnan viaduct

Our first stop was the Glenfinnan Viaduct visitor centre, where we parked up and made our way to the top of the hill for the best possible view. We really were amazed. The viaduct is not only a work of art but for me as a Harry Potter fan, it brings back magical childhood memories. Once we had soaked up the views we made our way to the waterfront where the Jacobite monument stands proud, overlooking Loch Shiel. Something about the clouds gave the hills an almost blue hue and the water quite a spooky look which added to the ambiance.

After plenty of photo opportunities, we were back on the road and heading towards Mallaig for a spot of lunch in a lovely location near the ferry port. The prawn roll was simply delicious. Our next stop was Spean Bridge for the night which gave us another excellent chance to enjoy the phenomenal Highland scenery and hospitality.

The following day, well-rested and eager for the next part of our adventure, we headed to Fort William train station for a tour of the Jacobite steam train. Having never seen a steam engine before I definitely felt like I was taken back in time. I can’t deny that I was also excited to be on the train that inspired the Hogwarts Express in the Harry Potter films. Walking along the platform surrounded in clouds of steam felt quite enchanting. It was lovely to see both kids and adults soaking up the experience in anticipation of the train’s departure.

The whole trip was very enjoyable. Driving through the Highlands was such a contrast to my normal journeys on motorways and around the city centre. The time seemed to fly by with so many wonderful sights to take in. I can’t wait to return to the west coast of Scotland again very soon!

Words and images by Daniela at McKinlay Kidd