A Hebridean Odyssey in Photos

Here at McKinlay Kidd, we love receving customer feedback. One of our regular customers, Sandro, was kind enough to share some incredible images from his recent holiday and we knew we wanted to hear more about his experience! Hailing from Switzerland, Sandro has previously embarked on a Scottish island-hopping holiday with us, and his latest trip took him to the breathtaking Outer Hebrides.

Below Sandro has selected a few of his favourite shots from his holiday, and has detailed the memories they invoke for him

Stac Dhòmnuill Chaim, Isle of Lewis

I have always had a penchant for landscape photography. It was a rainy afternoon and I got a little lost, but eventually made my way to the cliff edge. I ran as close as possible to the rocks, being careful not to slip and began to take some pictures. To me, this landscape seems unchanged since prehistoric times.

View of Skye from Lewis with Sheep

I then travelled further south, my holiday already peppered with beautiful memories. But What awaited me in Dunvegan was simply spectacular because of its simplicity and tranquillity. The surroundings were breathtaking – the thundering waves, the brisk wind and the bellowing sheep, not to mention the view of the Isle of Skye in the background … what a place. I miss this view and think about it daily.

Luskentyre Beach, Isle of Harris

What a landscape. I parked near the beach and ran across the dunes, unable to believe what I saw. The wind whistled around my ears, the clouds changed the scene all the time and the sea was bellowing so loud it was difficult to think. I breathed in the salty air and hoped so much that I could capture the mood for myself. It is one of the most beautiful places I have ever seen.

Old Cemetary, Berneray

My holiday continued to Uist and, as always, I looked up my travel documents and read “Roberts Recommendations”. I started to tour around Berneray, and the beach I found there was one of the wildest I have ever seen. Stone formations fought impressively against the wild sea and a multitude of seabirds were flying overhead. When I arrived at the graveyard, the sky was now threatening, much darker in color and contrast. By the time I arrived back at my hotel, I was exhausted, yet overjoyed and peaceful.

Prince’s Beach, Eriskay

I had no plans when I arrived in Eriskay, my car journey decided for me. As I went over a fairly steep hill and down the other side, I wondered if I had arrived on another planet! It was a really sunny day and the sea was a deep blue. I have been to many places around the world, but this was outstanding. The beach, the colors of the sea and the beautiful flowers on the rocks left me speechless. I spent a few hours at the beach, enjoying the view into the distance and the warm sunshine.

Our Lady, Star of the Sea, Isle of Barra

Barra is one of my great loves, and not just because of the world-famous airport. When I arrived and I saw that the weather was radiantly beautiful, I immediately wanted to climb to the famous ‘Our Lady, Star of the Sea’ statue. The walk up was steep but the view uniquely beautiful. I was alone, gazing at the view of Castlebay below. What a magical place of power. Barra is a real gem – full of beautiful beaches, ruins, warm people and fantastic scenery.

Traigh Mhor Beach, Isle of Barra

This picture was taken very spontaneously. On the way from Barra airport to my hotel on a Sunday afternoon I saw shell seekers digging in the mud on Cockle Strand. I went down to the beach with the car and chatted to the people. This little dog was very curious and interested in my equipment. So I knelt down to him and took this picture in the process.

Gallery of Modern Art, Glasgow

After a quick flight from Barra I was back in Glasgow, one of my favourite cities – but sad I couldn’t stay longer! After settling in my hotel, I grabbed my camera to visit all the places I had not seen before. Glasgow is a great city and there is so much to discover. I took this photo as it was getting dark, unaware that it was 1.30am as I was enjoying the mild climate.

Now that I’m back home, there are two bottles of Harris Gin in the closet and alongside my pictures, I have countless memories of a wonderful time. The simplicity and peace that I find in my travels in Scotland is unique. It is for this reason that I will continue to come back, as there is still so much to see.

McKinlay Kidd offer a variety of holidays in the Outer Hebrides, including fly-drive, self-drive and public transport options. Get in touch with our team today to arrange your tailor-made proposal.

The Paths of Fort Augustus

Waking up with a different view each morning is one of the best parts of tour guiding – and I like to use the dawn light to find new walks to share with the guests. In Fort Augustus, I borrowed my host’s dog, Bobby, a young black Labrador, who seemed intent on dislocating my shoulder. We set off as the sun rose over Beinn a’Bhacaidh; Loch Ness shimmered in the cool light.

We crossed the bascule bridge over the Caledonian Canal. A staircase of water locks stretched away to our right – boats waited at the top and bottom for the locks to open. Bobby’s ears perked up, his nose started sniffing like a chef sensing the soufflés were singeing. He hurtled along the canal path dragging me with him. 

We ran to the top of the locks where Bobby stopped. Beside us was the morning traffic. Put put pleasure boats jostled with grand tall yachts for pole position. Something was moving on an orange and green Dutch long-boat. Bobby whined as a furry face poked out from the hold. The scruffy terrier panted a couple of times, eyed Bobby, then disappeared below deck. Once the lock man woke up, these boats would travel on to Inverness and then out to the North Sea.

We headed back onto the pavement and walked past the monastery. Bobby span round my legs as a touring motorbike hummed by, then barked when it had turned the corner. An old stone bridge arched over river Tarff in front of us, to our left a path left the pavement. Bobby looked to me for confirmation, then headed down.  

A forest of mature oaks stood over a carpet of bluebells. The sun was up now; it evaporated the forest floor dew, warmed the wild garlic and white flowers. I could hear the baaing of waking sheep. We walked on till a meadow opened out before us – dozens of ewes and lambs lay in the grass. A farmer in his pick-up truck drove around the field checking his flock. Music was playing in the truck, and it floated over the air, slightly too quiet to recognise.

Bobby and I headed back into town. I dropped him off then went to meet the guests. The meadow path had certainly made it onto my recommendations for clients – Bobby had been a good companion. That being said, my shoulder was a bit raw.   

McKinlay Kidd offer a number of small group guided rail tours, including ‘Loch Ness, The Jacobite & Skye’, with departure dates in both 2019 or 2020. Reserve your place today, or call our team on 0141 260 9260 for more information.

Shades of Blue on the Isle of Harris

As the sun breaks through the cloud and hits the Atlantic Ocean, the water lights up in iridescent shades from pale green through to deep, deep blue, with a broad expanse of turquoise in between. The pale shell sand which extends far out from the shore, the clarity of the shallow sea and the reflections of a blue sky combine to create these remarkable colours.

It’s an impressive enough sight at the many beaches strung along the west coast of the Outer Hebrides. But nowhere is more spectacular than the Isle of Harris and particularly the junction of Seilebost and Luskentyre (below).

We parked up by Luskentyre and walked and walked along the shimmering sand, taking photo after photo, entranced by the light, the colours, the specks of other people in the distance, the blending of sea and sky. It’s hard to do justice to such a panorama whether on a camera phone or even a state of the art SLR. I used my little beach shoes in the best attempt to give some indication of scale.

The next day we meandered for miles along a single track road all the way to the wonderfully-named Hushinish beach. The wind certainly whistles but whether that translates into an onomatopoeic name, I’m not so sure. It’s wilder here, and even blustery preparations for a marquee-wedding could not detract from the elemental nature of this outpost. No parking on the beach, though!

We headed off across the machair, the coarse grass, sometimes strewn with wildflowers, usually pockmarked with sheep, for views over to the island of Scarp, made famous by the failed attempts to use mini rockets for mail delivery. In the distance we spied another glorious beach, whorls of sand flowing into the ocean blue.

Somewhere out to the west lay St Kilda. Although the sun shone brightly from a clear sky, the ferocity of the wind left no doubt as to why our intended boat trip there had been unable to take place. That will have to wait for the next visit.

The magical colours and ethereal landscape of Harris leave their mark, from the swirls of the Harris Gin bottle through to inspiration for the eponymous tweed and creativity in many guises. We left with a weighty souvenir by ceramicist Nikolai Globe. Every time I glance into it, I recall those myriad shades of blue and green and understand how easily they draw you back time and again.

Words & Images by Heather @ McKinlay Kidd

McKinlay Kidd offer a variety of holidays throughout the Outer Hebrides, including self-drive, fly-drive and public transport options. For more information – or for a tailor-made holiday proposal – please visit our website.

Close Encounters of the Puffin Kind

“We’ve decided to turn back. The path disappeared into the fog so we decided to stop before we went too far. Have fun though!”

I have to admit, this news was a little disheartening. My colleague Rhona and I had just arrived on Unst – Britain’s most northerly island, accessible via ferry from mainland Shetland. After a successful morning spotting some of archipelago’s extensive birdlife the day before at Sumburgh Head – the southern tip of the mainland – we had decided to head to Unst with one goal in mind: to spot some elusive puffins. With over 50,000 breeding pairs calling Hermaness Nature Reserve (situated in the north-west of Unst) home in the summer months, we thought this could be our perfect opportunity.

Admittedly, it was a little colder and foggier on Unst than we had been used to over the last few days – unsurprising given its geographical location. In spite of the advice of our fellow explorers, we decided to forge ahead and continue along the path, determined to achieve our goal.

The landscape on the Shetland islands was quite unlike any I had experienced before. Centuries of erosion and changing climate has created a complex terrain – peaty bogland melts into heathery hills, and blinding white sandy beaches can appear before your eyes at any moment. Unst certainly fitted into the first of these three, and shortly into our walk, the fog cleared and our vast surroundings were revealed.  

After a leisurely walk, it seemed as if by magic we were at the end of the well-maintained path. A short walk further, and slowly but surely jagged seacliffs unfolded before us. The panorama was staggering –looking out, there was nothing ahead but the vast, endless ocean. Wave battered crags stood in clusters beneath us, and it was clear from a brief look down that there were countless little areas of seclusion – perfect for a variety of birds to build their nests.

Cautious due to the height of the cliffs, we took a few reserved peeks over the side – no sign of puffins. We walked a little further, but still nothing aside from a few gulls. I was slightly dismayed – surely we would see at least one?

Then, as if responding to our wishes, our sought-after little birds began to appear. We spent the next hour observing around a dozen puffins, snapping photo after photo of them continuing on with their daily routine, entirely unbothered by our presence. We saw puffins dipping in and out of their burrows with freshly collected supplies for their nests, swooping off into the unknown to catch their latest meal and, rather sweetly, a young couple tapping beaks on the cliff’s edge.

We eventually managed to tear ourselves away from our front-row seat, heading back along the path and straight to Britain’s most northerly tearoom for some lunch and hot drinks, taking some time to warm up and reflect on our experience. Equally as enjoyable as the wildlife watching was the fact that we had the experience entirely to ourselves – both the path, and the cliffs themselves were entirely devoid of any other people the whole time. It was a truly special day – I am very glad we didn’t turn back!

Words & Images by Emma @ McKinlay Kidd

McKinlay Kidd offer a number of holidays to Shetland, including self-drive and fly-drive options, and the chance to visit Orkney at the same time. For more information, please give our team a call on 0141 260 9260 or visit our website.

Along the North Coast 500 (Part Two)

Driving in either direction (anti-clockwise/clockwise) on Scotland’s acclaimed North Coast touring route brings scenic riches and some of the best driving roads in Europe.

Last time I drove the route, I did so anti-clockwise, setting off from Inverness and heading North towards Caithness. It really pays to take your time, stopping often to seek out some of the terrific sights just off the beaten-track.

Everyone know’s John o’Groats, the UK mainland’s northernmost settlement, but less attention is paid to Dunnet Head, its northernmost point. The day I visited, the weather was blowing a spectacular ‘hooley’ (translation: it was a little wild!) in between bursts of sunshine and I had the place almost to myself; surely the best way to see any lighthouse and sheer cliff, the sea battering the rocks below for all it’s worth.

Tiptoeing along the tiny roads yawing west to Thurso, it’s not far from here to the Fast Breeder Reactor at Dounreay, currently undergoing decades-long decommissioning. Its eerie white sphere can seem to bob on the sea in certain conditions, and it was fun to take to the long, deserted track that heads away from it towards what seems like the edge of the earth.

I really fell in love with the North Coast on this trip, exploring as many as I could of the roads that stream off it, often terminating at hidden harbours and sparsely populated hamlets like Fresgoe, Portskerra, Totegan and Brawl.

Further west took me to the seething metropolis (not really) of Tongue, in the shadow of Ben Loyal. I loved this route so much I drove it twice – once in each direction, and didn’t see a single soul or vehicle, day or night, albeit my trip was outside the main summer season.

Along with the quality of the road surfaces (you won’t believe how good most of them are) and the spectacle of the scenery, that’s one of the best things about this route; no matter how popular you might think it is, it’s still possible to spend long stretches seemingly alone, especially by deviating away a little away from the main circuit. It’s the very antithesis of city life and it’s something I can never get enough of.

Words & images by Chris Hendrie @ McKinlay Kidd.

If you would like to experience the beauty of the Scotland’s North Coast for yourself, McKinlay Kidd offer a number of different holidays covering this famous routes. Browse our website for more information or get in touch and one of our team will be delighted to curate your tailor-made proposal.

The Charming Streets of Kinsale

Nestled on the edge of the south coast of Ireland and surrounded by the natural beauty of the glorious Irish countryside, the picturesque town of Kinsale offers a warm welcome to travellers from all over the globe.

At first glance, one may wonder why this small town attracts so many visitors, but after being lucky enough to spend a few days exploring on my recent trip to Ireland, it was quickly clear to me just what was so appealing about it.

Kinsale is full of colour and characterand every time you turn a corner on the countless skinny, winding roads, you are met with brightly painted houses, charming shops and cafes and, of course, an abundance of traditional pubs. Each locale is packed full of character and provides visitors with the chance to mingle with the friendly locals in front of a roaring fire. From my own experience, this was the perfect way to warm up on a damp windy night – Kinsale is perched on the edge of the Atlantic Ocean, after all!

When in Ireland…it would be rude not to!

The seaside location means there are countless restaurants offering freshly caught seafood, but I found I was also spoiled for choice with other local goodies such as cheese and whisky – there is definitely a reason why Kinsale has the most restaurants per head in Ireland . There is even a Willy Wonka-esque chocolate shop where all sorts of wacky creations are created on site! I was also able to sample culinary delights in the food markets set up along cobbled streets that are not much wider than a car.

My time in Kinsale was brief, but I am already planning a return visit on my next trip to Ireland. As it lies on the famous Wild Atlantic Way driving route, it is an excellent base where drivers can explore the surrounding area of County Cork and follow the twisting winding roads that scale the coastline of this breath-taking part of the country. I can only imagine the other quaint villages and beautiful beaches in this area, and I am itching to discover them.

The delicious food, postcard-perfect buildings, and shops full of quirky trinkets – many of which I happily lost an afternoon browsing through – meant Kinsale ticked all of the boxes on my holiday wish list!

McKinlay Kidd offer a number of holidays along the illustrious Wild Atlantic Way, many of which include a trip to Kinsale. Browse our Ireland holidays on our website, or alternatively give us a call on 0141 260 9260 to arrange a tailor-made Ireland holiday that suits your exact requirements.

Words and images by Rhona @ McKinlay Kidd

Rediscovering My Roots in Aberdeenshire

Our Operations Assistant Lisa recently spent some time retracing her childhood in Aberdeenshire – making some brand new memories along the way.

Having spent some of my childhood years growing up a few miles south of the city of Aberdeen it was great to visit the area older and wiser, fresh eyes combining with old recollections. My clearest memories involve being on the beach promenade, dipping my toes in the freezing North Sea, spotting jelly fish and running around at the fun fair.

The opportunity to visit the city and surrounding areas, 15 years later, was a trip down memory lane in so many ways.  Walking through the granite streets as an adult, I pass St. Mark’s Church where nine-year-old me attended Girls Brigade. I can’t help but fondly reminisce as I stare at the grand building, sandwiched between His Majesty’s Theatre and Aberdeen Central Library in the heart of the city.

My trip to the city and shire was not just one down memory lane. Myself and my colleague Chris enjoyed a jam-packed three days discovering sights both old and new, driving along the spiralled back roads that connect the remote towns and villages. One town I enjoyed in particular was Portsoy, 50 miles north-west of Aberdeen, tucked away along the Moray Firth coastline. It’s famous for marble, jewellery, fishing and whisky – some combination! We took a slow drive down the empty streets until we reached the town’s waterfront. The eeriness of the quiet streets filled me with a feeling of warm contentment. Although my visit took place in mid-November, I could only imagine how busy the place must be during the “warmer months”. However as a woman who has lived on the edge of the North East coast, I find being next to the sea in winter a heart-warming – if slightly chilling – experience!

Our visit to Portsoy was short but very sweet! A brisk stomp on top of the harbour wall was all I could muster before having to sprint for shelter and warmth. The harbour was deserted, with only the noise of squawking sea birds and the waves crashing, which made this experience even more special for me. The sight of the little colourful fishing boats, set against the back drop of the grey village made for a lovely moment.  Definitely just one of Aberdeenshire’s charming places to visit.

As we drove away from Portsoy, I was already making plans to return to the Moray Coast – perhaps in slightly warmer weather… Having visited the area for the first time in so many years, I am filled with so much inspiration for how to create the perfect holiday to this beautiful and fascinating part of Scotland.

Words & images by Lisa @ McKinlay Kidd.

North Wales – Travelling Through Space and Time?

It is a bright November day, the sky is blue, and the air is crisp – the perfect weather for my first trip to North Wales! We were spellbound by the drive through Snowdonia National Park, amazed by the green hills and deep valleys that seemed never-ending.  Now though, we have just parked in Betws-y-Coed, and are walking towards the river.

We are pleased to stretch our legs in this small village nestled deep in the mountains. Betws-y-Coed: the name itself makes me eager to learn more about Wales, its language and its culture. As we stroll along, we can hear water burbling – our destination is within reach. Picking up the pace, we reach a bridge. Below us, the white water of the river cascades under our feet, while in front of us charming stone houses host welcoming cafes, B&Bs and shops…what a stunning view!

As we continue through the countryside on our way to our next destination, the everchanging landscape brings back memories of my previous Irish road-trip, of weekends in the Highlands of Scotland and of my childhood holidays in the south of England. I am stunned: how can this small place pack in so much contrasting scenery?

At dusk we reach Portmeirion, where we will spend the night. I had seen pictures of this extraordinary place but experiencing it for myself is something else. We are walking down the colourful streets of what looks and feels like a coastal Italian village – even the air is warmer, although perhaps this is a coincidence! As the night falls and the bright colours start to fade, we look forward to the morning when we will see the sun rising over Portmeirion…

By contrast, the clouds are low in the sky when we reach Conwy. We enter the town walking through an opening in the massive stone walls of the fortress and, just like that, we have been transported back to medieval times.

The imposing Conwy Castle

We meander the paved streets filled with local shops and reach the sea front to have a look at the smallest house in Great Britain – a direct contrast to the imposing castle. We can’t help but take some time to appreciate the spectacular panorama of the countryside, Snowdonia, the river Conwy, and, in the distance, our next stop: Llandudno.

Leaving the 13th century behind us, we approach Llandudno. The clouds have lifted and the seaside resort welcomes us instantly with its wide streets, long seafront promenade and large white Victorian buildings. Unfortunately, we don’t have enough time to take the famous Great Orme tram – that will need to wait until next time!

On the drive back to Scotland, we try to recollect all the places we visited, everything we did and saw in North Wales, and then it hits me: Did I really witness so many different landscapes, architectural styles and historic periods in just 48 hours? This must be what time travel feels like!

We are now back in Scotland, but the sparkle has not left my eyes as I nibble the last of the Welsh cakes I brought back from the trip. I am already itching to go back to Wales, but even more than that, I can’t wait to help organise holidays for others to take the time to discover and enjoy this wonderful part of Britain.

McKinlay Kidd are offering a brand new selection of holidays to Wales in 2019, including castles, steam trains and garden visits. To book your holiday, just get in  touch with our award-winning team, who will be delighted to tailor-make your perfect trip!

Words & images by Helene @ McKinlay Kidd

A Slice of Paradise in Shetland

Having spent the majority of my adult life living in a city I found Shetland to be one of the most spectacular places I have ever visited. The shockingly beautiful and dramatic scenery really caught me by surprise and I must say that one of the highlights of my trip was St. Ninian’s Isle. I loved the contrast of a golden sandy tombolo beach followed by high jagged cliffs leading into the ocean.

After a day of exploring the north of the Shetland mainland we decided to make our way south while the weather and daylight were still on our side. As we were driving through the tiny roads of Bigton we turned a corner and all of a sudden saw this stunning view appear out of nowhere in front of us. We parked the car and made our way down to the beach. As we walked across it was amazing not only how green the water was but also how on either side of the tombolo the colours looked completely different. We continued across the beach and up the little the hill to reveal a sheer drop on the far side. One minute we could have been on a tropical beach and the next we were watching the waves crash against the jagged cliffs: it felt like we were at the edge of the world. We spent a while exploring the area whilst soaking up the fresh, salty air and enjoying the peace and quiet of our remote surroundings.

St. Ninians Isle, Shetland

Shetland in general seems to have an amazing relaxing quality about it. For my entire time there I was able to unwind and let the stresses of day to day life simply melt away. It’s a wonderful feeling to have brought home from this trip.

Words and Images from Daniela @ McKinlay Kidd.

Daniela explored Orkney and Shetland on a recent trip to get to know the island – our brand-new Complete Orkney & Shetland holiday can help you do the same thing. Get in touch and we will be delighted to arrange your Scottish island holiday. 

A Journey along Scotland’s North Coast

On a chilly April morning, I woke up bright and early to explore a small slice of Scotland’s north coast. I must admit that I approached my trip to Easter Ross and Wester Ross with excitement but also some trepidation. Spring was running extremely late in Scotland with the recent snow and heavy rain, and I was hoping I wouldn’t miss any of the dramatic landscape as a result!

Our first stop was the village of Cromarty, just 40 minutes from Inverness, but en route we decided to stop at Chanonry Point between Fortrose and Rosemarkie on the Black Isle, as the weather was in our favour. This is widely regarded as one of the best and most reliable places to see bottlenose dolphins and seals playing in the Moray Firth. Sadly I wasn’t lucky enough to spot them this time but the small secluded beach and picturesque lighthouse made for a lovely stopping point.

Our arrival in Cromarty was captivating; I hadn’t expected the sight of the ‘oil rig graveyard’ across the Cromarty Firth. Rigs that were active in the 70s – when off shore oil drilling was at its most profitable – now lie dormant, waiting patiently for the industry to take a lucrative turn again. The result is a haunting yet beautiful view. Cromarty too was full of surprises – what I originally saw as a sleepy, friendly village in fact has a vibrant underbelly, with dozens of cultural events each year including a film festival.

Cromarty Oil Rigs

We moved on to our next stop on the west coast, enjoying the change in scenery from flat yellow meadows to the renowned dramatic and rugged terrain of Scotland’s western highlands. Coinciding with the first real sunshine of Scotland’s spring, we were blessed with clear blue skies and the sight of glittering granite cliffs and snow-capped mountains on the horizon.

We headed for Ullapool, a cheerful seaside town with a lot of character and activity despite its remote location. Ullapool’s hardworking residents have transformed it into a hub of culture – the town hosts a number of music and book festivals annually alongside frequent art exhibitions. Seeing the snowy isle of Lewis in the distance from the harbour was a highlight of the day for me, and there is good walking to be had nearby for those wishing to stretch their legs. We had a little spare time before dinner and so visited the Corrieshalloch Gorge on the River-Droma – a truly impressive sight, despite my fear of heights!

The last stop on our particular run of the North Coast 500 was Shieldaig and Loch Torridon. A warm bowl of seafood chowder in the Shieldaig’s acclaimed fish restaurant warmed my bones on this chilly afternoon as the sun continued to shine. Our passing Poolewe and the Applecross Peninsula provided a first for me– a sighting of a wild mountain goat! He and his mates considered us carefully before trotting off – a friendly encounter that concluded my trip off very nicely before the drive back to Glasgow. As ever always with touring trips, I was left wanting more – next time I will definitely allow time in Skye or Glen Coe before returning home.

I came away from my trip in awe of the beauty of Scotland’s North Coast. We may only have visited one part of this iconic road trip, but I’m very lucky because at McKinlay Kidd, I have the opportunity to help our customers fall in love with it every day! One thing is for sure; I will be back to experience the rest very soon.

Words and Images from Caoimhe @ McKinlay Kidd 

Why not take a road trip like Caoimhe’s and discover Scotland’s North Coast? We have a number of different holiday options, or we can tailor-make  your perfect Scottish driving holiday.